Faculty in the News - Archive



Monday, June 26, 2006

Professor Rena Steinzor

Scientific American – An industry group filed a petition under the Data Quality Act a law intended to ensure that regulations are based on solid science arguing that a study funded by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute did not meet the act's standards and that the heart institute had therefore broken the law by posting them on its Web site. The law, also known as the Information Quality Act, was enacted in 2000 without public debate. "It was passed in the middle of the night as an appropriations rider," says Rena Steinzor, JD, a professor at the School of Law.

Monday, June 26, 2006

Professor Michael Greenberger

The Financial Times – The Commodity Futures Trading Commission has provoked a regulatory storm by throwing open for public debate at what point a foreign futures exchange becomes a U.S.exchange and thus subject to U.S. regulation. "The CFTC is driven by free market principle and the idea that they would gladly take on more regulatory responsibility is anathema to them," said Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and former director of markets and trading at the CFTC.

Friday, June 23, 2006

Professor Michael Greenberger

WUSA-TV – Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security, discussed the arrest of seven men on charges of conspiring to support the Al Qaida terrorist organization by planning attacks on numerous targets, including bombing the Sears Tower in Chicago.

Thursday, June 22, 2006

Professors Robin Wilson and Helen Norton

The Daily Record – The School of Law hosted a symposium examining conscience-based refusals in health care. Robin Wilson, JD, professor at the School of Law, said policies that require a health care provider to find someone else to dispense medication or do a procedure are inconsistent with the way objectors are treated in other fields. Helen Norton, JD, a visiting assistant professor at the School of Law, said the employment law regarding conscience-based refusals is governed by Title XII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which requires employers to reasonably accommodate workers’ sincere religious beliefs unless that would create an undue hardship.

Wednesday, June 21, 2006

Professor Robin Wilson

The Baltimore Examiner – The School of Law hosted a symposium examining conscience-based refusals in health care. In emergency situations, said Robin Wilson, JD, professor at the School of Law, the best policy is live and let live, often a compromise can be reached that doesn’t violate anyone’s conscience.

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500 W. Baltimore Street, Baltimore, MD 21201-1786 PHONE: (410) 706-7214 FAX: (410) 706-4045 / TDD: (410) 706-7714

Copyright © 2014, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. All Rights Reserved