Faculty in the News - Archive



Friday, June 30, 2006

Professor Michael Greenberger

Bloomberg News – President George Bush, rebuked by the U.S. Supreme Court for his anti-terror policy, may try to use a major legal setback to win a political victory. Bush, responding to yesterday’s high court decision that using military commissions to try terrorist suspects is unlawful, said he would ask Congress for legal authority to operate the tribunals. "The ruling may even give the Bush administration an opportunity to placate some U.S. allies by closing the prison," said Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security.

Friday, June 30, 2006

Professor Michael Greenberger

Bangor Daily News (editorial) – The U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that wartime tribunals created to try detainees at Guantanamo Bay are not valid under U.S. law or international treaties. The ruling offers the Bush administration a good way out of the Guantanamo problem, said Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security. For those who want to close the prison which President Bush on several occasions has said is his desire the ruling encourages the detainees to be treated as prisoners of war who can be tried in military courts-martial or civilian courts.

Friday, June 30, 2006

Professor Michael Greenberger

"Politics Live," ABC News Now, "Nightline," ABC – The U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that wartime tribunals created to try detainees at Guantanamo Bay are not valid under U.S. law or international treaties. "Five justices of the Supreme Court told the President that he must be controlled by the principles that Congress has set down for how to treat detainees caught in the war and that there are prescribed procedures he must follow and he does not have unilateral authority to make his own decisions in this area," said Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security.

Thursday, June 29, 2006

Professor Michael Greenberger

ABC World News Tonight – The U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that wartime tribunals created to try detainees at Guantanamo Bay are not valid under U.S. law or international treaties. "The President’s assertions that he has unfettered power in the war on terror were brought to a screeching halt by the court," said Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security.

Tuesday, June 27, 2006

Professor Robert Percival

The San Francisco Chronicle – The Supreme Court agreed to hear a case that will determine whether the Bush administration must regulate greenhouse gases, which could have broad consequences for California’s landmark law reining in vehicle emissions to fight global warming. "This could give us the answer to how the justices feel about one of the most important environmental issues of the future," said Robert Percival, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the School’s Environmental Law Program. "That is particularly significant because there are other cases percolating up through the courts where states have sued electric utilities over their emissions of greenhouse gases."

Go to page: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102


Back To Top

UM Shuttle UM | About This Site | Site Map | Contact Us


500 W. Baltimore Street, Baltimore, MD 21201-1786 PHONE: (410) 706-7214 FAX: (410) 706-4045 / TDD: (410) 706-7714
Copyright © 2014, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. All Rights Reserved.

Hotline Hotline



UM | About This Site | Site Map | Contact Us


500 W. Baltimore Street, Baltimore, MD 21201-1786 PHONE: (410) 706-7214 FAX: (410) 706-4045 / TDD: (410) 706-7714

Copyright © 2014, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. All Rights Reserved