Faculty in the News - Archive



Wednesday, July 19, 2006

Professor Michael Greenberger

WETA-FM – Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security, talked about how the Department of Homeland Security has slashed anti-terrorism funding for Washington, D.C., and the surrounding regions, as part of a decision to reduce grant funds for major urban areas in the Northeast while providing more to midsize cities.

Wednesday, July 19, 2006

Environmental Law Clinic

The (Annapolis) Capital – The guardians of several Anne Arundel County waterways oppose a set of proposed changes in the county’s Critical Area law, saying the revisions could make it easier to harm the Chesapeake Bay watershed, and that the changes do nothing to address shortcomings in the county’s Critical Area enforcement that were cited in a recent report by the School of Law’s Environmental Law Clinic.

Sunday, July 16, 2006

Senior Judicial Fellow and Lecturer Judge John Fader

The Kansas City Daily Record – Last month, the secretary of the Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services rejected an administrative law judge’s proposed opinion that Maryland death penalty procedures are illegal because they were not adopted in accordance with the Administrative Procedure Act. The Office of Administrative Hearings was created in 1990 so people with grievances against an agency could have their cases heard by an expert in administrative law who is unaffiliated with the agency. "Since state agencies have the ultimate responsibility for policy choices, though, they retain the power to decide whether an ALJ has made the right call," explained John Fader II, JD, a senior judicial fellow and lecturer at the School of Law and a former judge for the Circuit Court for Baltimore County.

Friday, July 14, 2006

Professor Michael Greenberger

The Baltimore Sun – The highly secret spy court that would pass judgment on the National Security Agency’s warrantless surveillance program under a deal announced yesterday has issued just one public ruling in its nearly 30-year history and from its inception was never intended to consider the kind of complex constitutional questions at issue in the heated debate over the government’s counterterrorism methods. "It’s not really a court that’s expected to do constitutional analysis," said Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security.

Friday, July 14, 2006

Adjunct Professor Andrew Levy

The Daily Record – Forensic examiners say computers and other advances have made it tougher for even a trained expert using high-tech equipment to determine whether a document is genuine. "Some of the new developments in forgery are enough to make some people long for the days of the best evidence rule, when lawyers looking to get a document admitted into evidence generally had to come up with the original," said Andrew Levy, JD, adjunct professor at the School of Law.

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500 W. Baltimore Street, Baltimore, MD 21201-1786 PHONE: (410) 706-7214 FAX: (410) 706-4045 / TDD: (410) 706-7714

Copyright © 2014, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. All Rights Reserved