Faculty in the News - Archive



Sunday, December 17, 2006

Professor Michael Greenberger

"Capital Sunday," WJLA-TV – Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security, talked about a new report that ranks Washington, D.C., and Maryland among the worst prepared in the nation for health emergencies and Congress’ passage of the Pandemic Flu and Health Preparedness Act.

Saturday, December 16, 2006

Adjunct Professor Andrew Levy

The Baltimore Sun – A Baltimore family that faced loss of its home yesterday over a ground rent lawsuit was allowed to stay when a City Council member brokered a last-minute reprieve. Court records show a company bought the ground rent in July 2004 and in November of the same year filed suit against Joseph and Mary Onheiser, Vernon Onheiser’s parents, who had been dead for years. Andrew Levy, JD, adjunct professor at the School of Law, questioned how lawsuits could be successfully pursued against dead people, unless the suits name the estate of the deceased. No estate existed for Joseph and Mary Onheiser. "You can’t sue a dead man," said Levy. "If a default judgment is entered against a dead person, it should have no legal effect."

Friday, December 15, 2006

Professor Michael Greenberger

"The Federal Drive," WFED-AM – During this live interview, Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security, talked about Congress' passage of the Pandemic Flu and Health Preparedness Act, which is awaiting the President's signature.


Friday, December 15, 2006

Professor Michael Greenberger

WTOP-FM – Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security, discussed the Department of Homeland Security’s proposed regulations tightening security on passenger and freight trains.

Tuesday, December 12, 2006

Professor Garrett Power

The Baltimore Sun – As they put up houses for sale, some Baltimore entrepreneurs are reviving the old practice of ground rents to make new profits. Rehabbers and ground rent holders are creating new rents on the land under those houses, saddling buyers with annual fees of more than $300. This has spurred a call by some legislators to reform ground rent law, but Garrett Power, LLB, LLM, a professor at the School of Law who has closely studied the ground rent system, says lawmakers can't abolish existing ground rents without compensating their owners because that would be unconstitutional. He said the General Assembly can compel ground rent holders to record their rents, giving homeowners and buyers more information to protect themselves. If the rents aren't recorded "within a period of years, maybe three years, then they would be extinguished," Power said.

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