Faculty in the News - Archive



Wednesday, January 11, 2006

Professor Michael Greenberger

WUSA-TV Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the University of Maryland Center for Health and Homeland Security, discussed the U.S. Supreme Court confirmation hearings for Judge Samuel Alito.

Tuesday, January 10, 2006

Professor Michael Greenberger

The Young Turks - Sirius Satellite Radio, The Bill Press Show - Sirius Satellite Radio Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the University of Maryland Center for Health and Homeland Security, discussed the opening day of the confirmation hearings for Judge Samuel A. Alito to the U.S. Supreme Court.

Tuesday, January 10, 2006

Assistant Dean Teresa LaMaster

The Los Angeles Times Blogs, short for "Web logs," personal postings on the Internet that are usually personal and opinionated, are a new source of employer-employee trouble. There are many existing laws regarding what employees can and can't say about their employers. "What is different about blogging is that it makes those public statements worldwide in a matter of nanoseconds," said Teresa LaMaster, JD, assistant dean for technology affairs and chief information officer at the School of Law.

Tuesday, January 10, 2006

Professor Michael Greenberger

The Albany Democrat-Herald, The East Oregonian - A U.S. Department of Justice report that faulted the FBI for sloppy work may strengthen a lawsuit filed against the agency by a Portland man who was arrested after his fingerprints were mistakenly identified during the investigation into the 2004 Madrid train bombings. Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the University of Maryland Center for Health and Homeland Security, said the delay in correcting the mistake may be ammunition for Brandon Mayfield to argue there was pressure to make an arrest.

Monday, January 9, 2006

Professor Michael Greenberger

Time Magazine Critics of Project Bioshield say most of the big pharmaceutical and biotech firms want nothing to do with developing biodefense drugs under the direction of the program, which the government said would quickly make available effective vaccines and treatments against agents such as anthrax, Ebola, and plague. Biodefense is "not attractive to big pharma, which is making money off things we use a few times a day," says Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the University of Maryland Center for Health and Homeland Security.

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Copyright © 2014, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. All Rights Reserved