Faculty in the News - Archive



Wednesday, February 16, 2005

Professor Michael Greenberger

WUSA-TV - Reporters at the New York Times and Time magazine may be jailed if they continue to refuse to answer questions before a grand jury about their confidential conversations with government sources regarding the leak of a covert CIA officer's identity, a federal appeals court ruled. Michael Greenberger, JD, professor, School of Law, and director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security, discussed the case. He also discussed a federal judge's recent decision to dismiss the Baltimore Sun challenge of Gov. Ehrlich's decision to bar state employees from speaking with two of the newspaper's journalists.

Friday, February 11, 2005

Professor Michael Greenberger

New York Times - A contract interrogator for the Central Intelligence Agency, charged with beating an Afghan prisoner who died the next day, is basing his defense in part on statements by President Bush and other officials that called for tough action to prevent terrorist attacks and protect American lives. Michael Greenberger, JD, director, Center for Health and Homeland Security and professor, School of Law, discusses the case.

Wednesday, February 9, 2005

Professor Rena Steinzor

The Baltimore Sun - Business columnist Jay Hancock discusses Monday's federal indictment of W.R. Grace & Co. It is the first attempt in the United States to hold a manufacturer of asbestos-containing products criminally liable for health and environmental harm, experts say. "Judges are reluctant to apply to someone that kind of (criminal) responsibility when they didn't actually write down on a piece of paper, 'I know I'm doing wrong and I don't care,' " says Rena Steinzor, JD, professor, School of Law, and director of the School's environmental law clinic. Read More

Wednesday, February 9, 2005

Professor Michael Millemann

The Baltimore Sun In an effort to target some of Maryland's most violent criminals, Gov. Robert Ehrlich Jr.'s legislative agenda this year includes a bill that would give prosecutors broader powers to go after anyone who intimidates or harms witnesses. Witness intimidation is a chronic problem in Baltimore that stymies many of the city's homicide cases. Says Michael Millemann, JD, professor, School of Law, "The goal is laudable, but there are too many problems with (the bill's) approach. The system will encourage people to be unavailable for trial and encourage police not to find them." [Read More]

Sunday, February 6, 2005

Professor Lisa Fairfax

The Baltimore Sun - This week, two lawsuits from shareholders who contend that higher-ups at the financial institution formerly known as Allfirst Bank should have known about and policed the $690 million trading scandal will be merged into a 70-page complaint in federal court in New York. "There is this desire on the part of judges and certainly the public to impose a heightened standard on (corporate) directors and officers to ensure they know more about their companies," says Lisa Fairfax, JD, professor, School of Law. Read More

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Copyright © 2014, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. All Rights Reserved