Faculty in the News - Archive



Sunday, April 3, 2005

Professor Thomas Perez

The Washington Post Thomas Perez, JD, assistant professor, School of Law, is profiled in his role as president of the nine-member Montgomery County Council. It is noted that beyond "the glass of its Rockville office buildings is a (Montgomery County) leadership that in Perez's view remains too white, too Anglo and too unreflective of the community it represents." [Read More]

Thursday, March 31, 2005

Dean Karen Rothenberg
Associate Dean Diane Hoffmann
Senior Judicial Fellow John Fader
Professor Christopher Brown


WJZ-TV, WBAL Radio - John Fader II, JD, a former judge and currently a senior judicial fellow and lecturer in the School of Law, heard a case in 1991 argued by C. Christopher Brown, JD, associate professor, School of Law, when Brown represented the wife of a man named Ronald Mack. Mack, like Terri Schiavo of Florida, was said to be in a vegetative state. A ruling by Fader ensured that a feeding tube for Mack would remain in place. (The case became a landmark decision in Maryland that, two years later, led state legislators to pass Maryland's living will law. Two principal architects of the law at the time were Diane Hoffmann, JD, now the associate dean, School of Law, and Karen Rothenberg, JD, MPA, dean, School of Law.) Fader was a live guest during "The Ron Smith Show" to talk about the Mack case and the current climate in Maryland regarding living wills.

Thursday, March 31, 2005

Thurgood Marshall Law Library

The Baltimore Sun In a move to encourage the state Senate to support renaming Baltimore-Washington International Airport for Thurgood Marshall, lawmakers and African-American political leaders held a news conference March 28 featuring the civil rights pioneer's widow and son. A newspaper editorial states, "Here's the more difficult question: Is renaming an airport an appropriate honor for Mr. Marshall?" Statues of Mr. Marshall can be found prominently displayed outside Baltimore's federal courthouse and the State House in Annapolis. The University of Maryland's Law Library (the Thurgood Marshall Law Library in the School of Law) is named after him. Certainly the state could do more. But in considering that, we also ought to ponder the fate of Maryland's Frederick Douglass, Benjamin Banneker and Harriet Tubman, and the many other African-Americans who deserve greater public attention, too." [Read More]

Wednesday, March 30, 2005

Dean Karen Rothenberg
Associate Dean Diane Hoffmann
Senior Judicial Fellow John Fader


Associated Press, The Washington Post, WBAL-TV - John Fader II, JD, a former judge and currently a senior judicial fellow and lecturer in the School of Law, heard a case in 1991 argued by C. Christopher Brown, JD, associate professor, School of Law, when Brown represented the wife of a man named Ronald Mack. Mack, like Terri Schiavo of Florida, was said to be in a vegetative state. A ruling by Fader ensured that a feeding tube for Mack would remain in place. The case became a landmark decision in Maryland that, two years later, led state legislators to pass Maryland's living will law. Two principal architects of the law at the time were Diane Hoffmann, JD, now the associate dean, School of Law, and Karen Rothenberg, JD, MPA, dean, School of Law. These legal experts gathered to discuss the Mack case and the current parameters in Maryland for living wills. They were joined by Maryland Attorney General J. Joseph Curran, Jr. [Read More] [Read More]

Wednesday, March 30, 2005

Dean Karen Rothenberg
Associate Dean Diane Hoffmann
Senior Judicial Fellow John Fader
Professor Christopher Brown


Associated Press, Washington Post, WBAL-TV - John Fader II, JD, a former judge and currently a senior judicial fellow and lecturer in the School of Law, heard a case in 1991 argued by C. Christopher Brown, JD, associate professor, School of Law, when Brown represented the wife of a man named Ronald Mack. Mack, like Terri Schiavo of Florida, was said to be in a vegetative state. A ruling by Fader ensured that a feeding tube for Mack would remain in place. The case became a landmark decision in Maryland that, two years later, led state legislators to pass Maryland's living will law. Two principal architects of the law at the time were Diane Hoffmann, JD, now the associate dean, School of Law, and Karen Rothenberg, JD, MPA, dean, School of Law. These legal experts gathered to discuss the Mack case and the current parameters in Maryland for living wills. They were joined by Maryland Attorney General J. Joseph Curran, Jr. [Read More] [Read More]

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