Faculty in the News - Archive



Thursday, April 21, 2005

Professor Michael Greenberger

The Baltimore Sun Signaling a possible conclusion in the only American criminal case tied to the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, a federal judge in Virginia scheduled a hearing for April 22 to accept a guilty plea from alleged terror conspirator Zacarias Moussaoui. If a plea agreement goes forward, it would begin to draw to a close a case that has stretched on for more than three years without a trial and with few revelations about the 2001 terrorist plot. "My own view is we will not learn anything more than what we've learned from the 9/11 commission. And it would be such a bizarre proceeding, that it probably would not have much of a cathartic effect for the families," says Michael Greenberger, JD, director, Center for Health and Homeland Security and professor, School of Law. [Read More]

Wednesday, April 20, 2005

Professor Mark Graber

The Washington Post - A decision that has governed police interrogations for two decades has the chance to be reexamined, some legal experts believe, now that the U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to hear the case of a teenager who allegedly implicated himself in a high-profile Annapolis slaying. The teenager was not tried because state judges determined he was unfairly questioned by police. Mark Graber, JD, PhD professor, School of Law, is quoted. [Read More]

Wednesday, April 20, 2005

Professor Michael Greenberger

Kansas City Star Before a guilty plea was entered by alleged terror conspirator Zacarias Moussaoui, the motives for that prospective plea were discussed by Michael Greenberger, JD, director, Center for Health and Homeland Security and professor, School of Law. Greenberger said there was some speculation that Moussaoui was considering a guilty plea at the time in a misguided attempt to get the U.S. Supreme Court to take up his case. The prospect at the time of Moussaoui's plea seemed all the more curious because the government's case against him is not air tight. "I think he has a fighting chance to beat things back in a jury trial," Greenberger said.

Tuesday, April 19, 2005

Professors Michael Greenberger & Mark Graber

The Baltimore Sun At the urging of Maryland prosecutors, the U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to hear the case of a teenager who allegedly implicated himself in a high-profile Annapolis slaying but was not tried because state judges determined he was unfairly questioned by police. Experts say that the decision could lead to a further honing by the justices of the so-called "Miranda rights" familiar to viewers of police dramas. Michael Greenberger, JD, professor, School of Law, and Mark Graber, JD, PhD professor, School of Law, discuss the case and its potential implications for constitutional law. [Read More]

Tuesday, April 19, 2005

Professor Michael Greenberger

Washington Post, Minneapolis Star-Tribune Zacarias Moussaoui has notified the government that he intends to plead guilty to his alleged role in the Sept. 11, 2001, terror attacks and could enter the plea to his alleged role in the attacks as early as this week if a judge finds him mentally competent, sources familiar with the case say. Michael Greenberger, JD, professor, School of Law, and a former high-level Department of Justice official, said that Moussaoui "certainly has acted in a bizarre fashion that heads you in the direction of questioning his competence, but I think there is room here for a finding that he does understand what is going on and can make judgments on his own and is therefore competent." [Read More]

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