Faculty in the News - Archive



Tuesday, May 17, 2005

Professor Michael Greenberger

WUSA-TV - When a light plane mistakenly flew within three miles of the White House, it demonstrated gaps in the communications system between federal and local authorities, according to Michael Greenberger, JD, director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security and professor in the School of Law. He called for annual bioterrorism drills in Washington, DC similar to those that already are being conducted in Baltimore.

Tuesday, May 17, 2005

Professor Ellen Weber

The Baltimore Sun Mayor Martin O'Malley has renewed his support for legislation that would make it easier for drug treatment programs to open, partly allaying the concerns of treatment advocates who worried he was wavering. Some drug treatment advocates had been told that the mayor would not reintroduce the bills and might sign only one of them if it passed anyway, said Ellen M. Weber, JD, an assistant professor at the School of Law and a drug policy activist. [Read More]

Saturday, May 14, 2005

Professor Irving Breitowitz

Cleveland Jewish News Rabbi Yitzchok (Irving) Breitowitz, JD, professor, School of Law, discussed bioethical questions within the context of Jewish law. His remarks were offered in Cleveland at a conference on medical ethics and the Jewish tradition. "In many ways, the allocation of scarce resources is the most complicated problem in our society. Not everyone will get everything," Breitowitz said.

Thursday, May 12, 2005

Professor Michael Greenberger

WTOP Radio Michael Greenberger, JD, professor, School of Law, and director of its Center for Health and Homeland Security, said the response to the Cessna that flew within two miles of the Capitol revealed several details of the Washington, D.C., response plan that still need to be worked out including notification of city authorities and notification of President Bush.

Wednesday, May 11, 2005

Professor Michael Greenberger

WBAL Radio, WBAL-TV - Convicted snipers John Allen Muhammad and Lee Boyd Malvo will return to stand trial in Maryland, site of six of the 10 sniper killings that paralyzed Washington-area residents with fear during several weeks in the fall of 2002. Michael Greenberger, JD, director, Center for Health and Homeland Security and professor, School of Law, discussed this development. With regard to the residents of Montgomery County who were affected by the sniper killings, Greenberger said that this decision affords an opportunity to bring about "closure" for the county's residents, and the victims' families in particular.

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500 W. Baltimore Street, Baltimore, MD 21201-1786 PHONE: (410) 706-7214 FAX: (410) 706-4045 / TDD: (410) 706-7714

Copyright © 2014, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. All Rights Reserved