Faculty in the News - Archive



Friday, June 10, 2005

Senior Judicial Fellow John Fader

The Daily Record Retired judge John Fader II, senior fellow at the School of Law, discusses the so-called "conscience clause" in Maryland. Fader, a licensed pharmacist, was asked by pharmacy students if, under Maryland law, they could be forced to fill prescriptions they feel are morally objectionable. Fader says "conscience clause" is an issue of great concern throughout the country, and it's only a matter of time before it erupts in Maryland. [Read More]

Thursday, June 9, 2005

Professor Michael Greenberger

WTOP Radio In a nationwide advertising blitz, the Homeland Security Department has urged businesses and families to "Get Ready Now" for potential terror attacks or other disasters. But an internal audit concluded that computer systems at 19 department sites that served agencies such as the Transportation Security Administration, Customs and Border Protection, and the Coast Guard had no functioning backups or relied on obviously deficient or incomplete backups. Michael Greenberger, JD, director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security, and a professor at the Law School, was interviewed about problem. [Read More]

Wednesday, June 8, 2005

Professor Douglas Colbert

The Baltimore Sun Two 9-year-old siblings and their 10-year-old cousin were killed last year in their northwest Baltimore apartment. The trial of the children's uncle and cousin, both charged with first-degree murder, starts today. Douglas Colbert, JD, a professor at the School of Law, comments on the importance of establishing a motive for the crime in the eyes of jurors. [Read More]

Wednesday, June 8, 2005

Professor Michael Greenberger

WUSA-TV - In his weekly appearance on this Washington news broadcast, Michael Greenberger, JD, director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security and a professor in the Law School, was interviewed about calls to shut down the Guantanamo Bay detention facility and about the arrest of a father and son in an alleged al-Qaida cell in California.

Tuesday, June 7, 2005

Clinical Law Program

The Daily Record The Maryland Court of Special Appeals held that a 1972 murder sentence was illegal since the judge at the time did not realize he had the power to suspend all or part of the sentence. The case was brought by the Post-Conviction Clinic at the School of Law. [Read More]

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500 W. Baltimore Street, Baltimore, MD 21201-1786 PHONE: (410) 706-7214 FAX: (410) 706-4045 / TDD: (410) 706-7714

Copyright © 2014, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. All Rights Reserved