Faculty in the News - Archive



Wednesday, December 7, 2005

Professor Michael Greenberger

The Wall Street Journal The government fell short in a high-profile prosecution that hinged on evidence admitted under the USA Patriot Act as a federal jury in Florida refused to convict a former professor accused of supporting a Palestinian terrorist group. Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the University of Maryland Center for Health and Homeland Security, said the verdict shows that "no matter the extent of the broad powers the government has been given under the Patriot Act, jurors are still going to apply common sense to the facts that are presented to them."

Wednesday, December 7, 2005

Professor Michael Greenberger

The New York Times A German citizen who says he was abducted in 2003, beaten and taken to Afghanistan by American agents in what was apparently a case of mistaken identity, filed a lawsuit in federal court against George J. Tenet, the former CIA director, and three companies suspected of being involved in secret CIA flights. Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the University of Maryland Center for Health and Homeland Security, said Khaled el-Masri's lawyers faced "a steep uphill climb" in making their case in the Eastern District of Virginia and the conservative 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond, Va.

Wednesday, December 7, 2005

Professor Michael Greenberger

WUSA-TV - Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the University of Maryland Center for Health and Homeland Security, discussed the acquittal of a former professor accused of supporting a Palestinian terrorist group and Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice's trip to Germany where she explained the Bush administration's views on secret prisons and the treatment of terrorist suspects.

Tuesday, December 6, 2005

Professor Michael Greenberger

Reuters, and 7 more newspapers - In October, the U.S. Senate overwhelmingly passed a proposal by Republican Sen. John McCain of Arizona, who was tortured as a prisoner during the Vietnam War, for a ban on "cruel, inhumane, and degrading" treatment of detainees. But the White House has been pushing to exempt the CIA, arguing that it would hamper anti-terrorism operations. Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the University of Maryland Center for Health and Homeland Security, said McCain was trying to bring the United States into compliance with international norms, while President Bush wanted to leave the door open for the CIA to act beyond those norms without prosecution.

Tuesday, December 6, 2005

Professor Michael Greenberger

WJZ-TV - Hospitals are not prepared to handle the patients who would arrive after a disaster or a pandemic; most states have few plans in place for coping; and the federal government has not taken charge of such preparation, according to a report released by the Trust for America's Health. On 10 key measures of preparedness, most states received a five or less. Maryland met four. "The state, the city, and the counties are working very, very hard and without the resources they deserve to meet this challenge," said Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the University of Maryland Center for Health and Homeland Security.

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500 W. Baltimore Street, Baltimore, MD 21201-1786 PHONE: (410) 706-7214 FAX: (410) 706-4045 / TDD: (410) 706-7714

Copyright © 2014, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. All Rights Reserved