Faculty in the News - Archive



Monday, June 13, 2005

Professor Andy Levy

WBAL TV After a four-month trial, singer Michael Jackson was found not guilty of charges that he supplied alcohol to a 13-year-old cancer patient, molested him, then conspired to imprison the boy and his family. Andrew Levy, JD, adjunct professor at the School of Law, provided analysis on the verdict in a live interview, calling it a "clean sweep" for the defense, and saying that Jackson's "weirdness may have worked in his favor."

Sunday, June 12, 2005

The Environmental Law Clinic

The Washington Post In an editorial, Democratic State Sen. Brian Frosh argues that the environmental policy of Gov. Robert Erhlich has contributed to worsening air quality. The Environmental Law Clinic at the School of Law is mentioned. [Read More]


Friday, June 10, 2005

Professor Michael Greenberger

The Baltimore Sun President Bush is pressing Congress to renew key provisions of the USA Patriot Act that have alarmed civil libertarians. The legislation would give the FBI unprecedented access to personal records without first getting a warrant. Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law, calls this "worrisome." "Basically, if you have a valid reason for doing a search, judges are going to grant you a warrant," says Greenberger. [Read More]

Friday, June 10, 2005

Professor Michael Greenberger

WTOP Radio A new report by the Justice Department casts a critical eye on the FBI and CIA for missed opportunities in tracking down two of the 9/11 hijackers. Michael Greenberger, JD, and professor at the School of Law, comments on says that although there are not a lot of new facts, it does offer more detail than before. Greenberger stressed that the president and attorney general should complete a fundamental analysis of the FBI and make the appropriate changes complete.

Friday, June 10, 2005

Professor Robert Percival

People's Weekly World The American Civil Liberties Union of New Mexico has filed a lawsuit against the Albuquerque School District for failing to notify parents that they could refuse to allow schools to send their children's contact information to military recruiters. Robert V. Percival, JD, a constitutional law professor at the School of Law, cites rulings that make the access of student information by the military illegal, including the Buckley Amendment passed in 1974. "The Buckley Amendment," says Percival, "gave students power over their records and other private information including their names and addresses." [Read More]

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500 W. Baltimore Street, Baltimore, MD 21201-1786 PHONE: (410) 706-7214 FAX: (410) 706-4045 / TDD: (410) 706-7714

Copyright © 2014, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. All Rights Reserved