Faculty in the News - Archive



Wednesday, August 24, 2005

Professor Michael Greenberger

WUSA-TV - Michael Greenberger, JD, a professor at the School of Law, commented on a recent government warning that terrorists may pose as homeless to conduct surveillance of buildings and mass transit facilities. The advisory is part of a broader attempt to make citizens, especially those who use transit systems, aware of things "that seem to be out of place," Greenberger said. In the same newscast, he commented on the Jordanian arrest of a prime suspect in the rocket attack in Aqaba, saying it marks "the first time there has been an indication the insurgence are moving outside of Iraq to attack United States facilities."

Tuesday, August 23, 2005

Professor Andrew Levy

The Baltimore Sun, WBAL-TV Jurors weighing the fate of two Mexican men accused of murdering three children have submitted more than 60 written questions to the judge. Andrew Levy, JD, an adjunct professor at the School of Law, said allowing jurors to ask questions during a trial is a growing trend to get them more involved in the process.

Monday, August 22, 2005

Professor Michael Greenberger

Investor's Business Daily More than one year after it was launched, Project Bioshield has not kept pace with its goal of providing stockpiles of drugs used to treat Americans in the case of biological, chemical, and radiological attacks. "The government is moving at a snail's pace with no sense of urgency. This thing could never get off the ground. The government created a program, and nobody thought to make it work," said Michael Greenberger, JD, a professor at the School of Law and director of the University of Maryland's Center for Health and Homeland Security.

Monday, August 22, 2005

Professor Douglas Colbert

The Dallas Morning News Peremptory challenges the right to dismiss jurors without reason in jury trials are surviving calls for reform despite decades of controversy and a recent statement by U.S. Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer that "a jury system without peremptories is no longer unthinkable." After a high court ruling in 1935 that blacks could not be excluded from juries by law or practice, prosecutors began routinely using their peremptory strikes to remove them, says Doug Colbert, JD, a professor at the University of Maryland School of Law.

Friday, August 19, 2005

Professor Michael Pinard

The Washington Post - Two Maryland appellate courts have overturned the men's convictions, holding that Prince George's police detectives violated their rights in obtaining videotaped statements. "If suspects assert their rights to an attorney and it's repeatedly ignored, it suggests not only a lack of training, but a lack of commitment to the Fifth Amendment" (the right against self-incrimination), said Michael Pinard, JD, assistant professor at the School of Law.

Go to page: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80


Back To Top

UM Shuttle UM | About This Site | Site Map | Contact Us


500 W. Baltimore Street, Baltimore, MD 21201-1786 PHONE: (410) 706-7214 FAX: (410) 706-4045 / TDD: (410) 706-7714
Copyright © 2014, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. All Rights Reserved.

Hotline Hotline



UM | About This Site | Site Map | Contact Us


500 W. Baltimore Street, Baltimore, MD 21201-1786 PHONE: (410) 706-7214 FAX: (410) 706-4045 / TDD: (410) 706-7714

Copyright © 2014, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. All Rights Reserved