Faculty in the News - Archive



Tuesday, December 20, 2005

Professor Robert Condlin

The Daily Record An attorney disbarred last week by the Maryland Court of Appeals says the state court was powerless to act because, after oral arguments, he removed the case to federal court. However, his arguments are unlikely to support removing the case to federal court, according to Robert Condlin, JD, a professor at the School of Law. "He's probably wrong in the sense that there isn't any federal issue at stake as states have the historic authority to discipline lawyers," said Condlin.

Tuesday, December 20, 2005

Professor Michael Greenberger

The Globe and Mail, The Baltimore Sun President George W. Bush said that it was lawful for him to secretly order wiretapping of telephone calls to and from the United States, despite a 1978 law banning such intercepts without explicit authorization from a special court. "He has no legs to stand on," said Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security. "Bush is waving a bloody flag to try and confuse people. They have all the legal weapons they need to fight terrorism; this is a totally needless program."

Monday, December 19, 2005

Rebecca Bowman-Rivas

The Baltimore Sun Although writing classes in women's prison are rare nationwide, programs like the one in a Jessup prison help women explore the roots of their behavior and can help them change. "When you're dealing with female prisoners, the majority likely have histories of some kind of abuse or trauma, be it sexual abuse, physical abuse. And I believe that writing about it is very helpful for women," said Rebecca Bowman-Rivas, LCSW-C, a clinical instructor at the School of Law.

Monday, December 19, 2005

Professor Michael Greenberger

WTOP-AM Michael Greenberger, JD, a professor at the School of Law and director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security, discussed why Democrats and Republicans have called separately for congressional investigations into President Bush's decision after the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks to allow domestic eavesdropping without court approval.

Monday, December 19, 2005

School of Law

The Baltimore Sun An investigation by The Sun has found that Marylanders are unlikely to find out from their state's Internet site, or any other public records, about a doctor's medical malpractice claims settled by insurance companies, and how much was paid to patients who alleged that they were injured. Just how tightly Maryland laws conceal a doctor's claims history became clear in 2004 as the General Assembly debated what to do about rising malpractice premiums. Lawmakers were "flying almost blind," Sen. Brian E. Frosh, a Montgomery County Democrat, recalled in a recent symposium on malpractice legislation at the School of Law.

Go to page: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80


Back To Top

UM Shuttle UM | About This Site | Site Map | Contact Us


500 W. Baltimore Street, Baltimore, MD 21201-1786 PHONE: (410) 706-7214 FAX: (410) 706-4045 / TDD: (410) 706-7714
Copyright © 2014, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. All Rights Reserved.

Hotline Hotline



UM | About This Site | Site Map | Contact Us


500 W. Baltimore Street, Baltimore, MD 21201-1786 PHONE: (410) 706-7214 FAX: (410) 706-4045 / TDD: (410) 706-7714

Copyright © 2014, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. All Rights Reserved