Faculty in the News - Archive



Saturday, October 15, 2005

Professor Michael Greenberger

Bloomberg News U.S. regulators, including the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, are stepping in to help prevent a collapse at Refco Inc., the largest independent U.S. futures broker, over concerns it would destabilize markets. "There is every sign here that this is a systemic problem, and Refco is one of the dots that needs to be connected," said Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and former director of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission's Division of Trading and Markets.

Saturday, October 15, 2005

Professor Michael Greenberger

The Wall Street Journal The Refco situation, which involves concerns about the financial services firm's solvency, is fueling calls for more regulatory scrutiny of futures trading at a time when the Sarbanes-Oxley law has toughened the rules covering publicly traded companies' accounting practices. "Now the entire multitrillion-dollar market of over-the-counter derivatives is opaque to the federal government and regulators," said Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and former director of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission's Division of Trading and Markets.

Saturday, October 15, 2005

Professor Michael Greenberger

The Scotsman (UK) MAN Group's brokerage unit, MAN Financial, is among potential bidders that have begun circling Refco, a commodities brokerage, which has been brought to its knees by a multimillion-dollar accounting fraud. "I don't see how they're [Refco] going to survive this," said Michael Greenberger, JD, a professor at the School of Law and former director of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission's Division of Trading and Markets.

Friday, October 14, 2005

Professor Michael Greenberger

Reuters Refco Inc., a financial services firm beset by charges of fraud, unraveled further on Friday as it began to shut down a second major business unit. "I don't see how they're going to survive this," said Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and former director of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission's Division of Trading and Markets.

Friday, October 14, 2005

Professor Michael Greenberger

The Sunday Times (UK) Goldman Sachs, the Wall Street investment banking firm, has started a fire sale of the assets of Refco, the embattled futures trader, as regulators attempt to stem widespread panic in financial markets. Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and former director of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission's Division of Trading and Markets, said Refco could be the harbinger of a far bigger problem.

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Copyright © 2014, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. All Rights Reserved