Faculty in the News - Archive



Saturday, October 29, 2005

Professor Susan Hankin

The Baltimore Sun At a time when many people view pets as part of the family and not just as property, the legal profession must learn a new field of law. Courts are also beginning to change the way domestic pets are classified. "The way we value animals is changing, and the law is just beginning to catch up with that," said Susan Hankin, JD, an associate professor at the School of Law, who is writing a paper on the evolving legal status of pets. The School of Law, along with 36 other law schools nationwide, now offers classes on animal law.

Saturday, October 29, 2005

Professors Kelly Casey, Kerry Rodgers and Chandra Sriram

The Daily Record - The School of Law added three faculty members for the 2005-06 academic year: Kelly Casey, JD, assistant professor of law; Kerry Rodgers, JD, MES, visiting professor; and Chandra Sriram, PhD, JD, visiting associate professor of law. Casey will teach international, intellectual property, and patent law. Rodgers will teach at the Environmental Law Clinic, and Sriram will teach courses on international human rights and international law.

Friday, October 28, 2005

School of Law

The Daily Record Miles & Stockbridge's satellite law office in the first building of the UMB BioPark in west Baltimore stands in stark contrast to the firm's central base, a scant mile, but seemingly a world away at 10 Light St. The firm won't be the only legal resource around: The School of Law's own Intellectual Property Legal Resource Center will also have a space in the BioPark, where students, with faculty supervision, will have a chance to provide free legal assistance to businesses in the technology sector.

Friday, October 28, 2005

Professor Michael Greenberger

The Baltimore Sun Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the University of Maryland Center for Health and Homeland Security, discusses Harriet E. Miers' withdrawal as a nominee to the U.S. Supreme Court. "She was nominated out of weakness, and she was withdrawn out of weakness," said Greenberger.

Friday, October 28, 2005

Professor Andrew Levy

The Associated Press, The Houston Chronicle, The Denver Post, Special Broadcasting Service (Australia) - The indictment of vice presidential advisor I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby Jr. is built on charges of obstruction of justice, making false statements, and perjury. "Perjury and false statements can be remarkably easy to prove," said Andrew Levy, JD, an adjunct professor at the School of Law. "So often it's the cover-up that ensnares people."

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500 W. Baltimore Street, Baltimore, MD 21201-1786 PHONE: (410) 706-7214 FAX: (410) 706-4045 / TDD: (410) 706-7714

Copyright © 2014, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. All Rights Reserved