Faculty in the News - Archive



Tuesday, November 15, 2005

Visiting Professor Max Stearns

The Daily Record The U.S. Supreme Court has dismissed a Maryland case that could have determined whether and how police may remedy a Miranda violation. Max Stearns, JD, a distinguished visiting professor at the School of Law, said the Supreme Court sometimes dismisses a case when the issue the justices are asked to decide is clouded by extraneous factors.

Tuesday, November 15, 2005

Professor Abraham Dash

The Washington Post The U.S. Supreme Court let stand a ruling that an incriminating statement that Leeander Blake gave police about a carjacking and murder in Annapolis in 2002 was taken improperly. The one-sentence order means that, for reasons that were not explained, a majority believed the court's intervention was not appropriate, said Abraham Dash, JD, professor at the School of Law.

Monday, November 14, 2005

Professor Mark Graber

WBAL-TV - Many people are calling the U.S. Census Bureau's American Community Survey too personal and intrusive because it asks them to answer questions like how much they earn, what their mortgage payment is, and threatens them with fines if they do not answer. Mark Graber, PhD, JD, a professor at the School of Law, said, "As a legal matter, the government can probably do this with exception to questions that invade privacy; but most citizens don't have lawyers, and you don't want citizens guessing at their own peril."

Monday, November 14, 2005

Professor Doug Colbert

The Morning Edition, WYPR Radio - Students from the Access to Justice Clinic at the School of Law have developed a pamphlet to help defendants understand their rights after an arrest. Doug Colbert, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the clinic, said the flier will be given to detainees at jails across Maryland starting this week.

Sunday, November 13, 2005

Professor Larry Gibson

The Associated Press, WJZ.com Larry Gibson, LLB, professor at the School of Law, helped a Liberian candidate in her bid to become the first-elected female head of state in Africa. "There was a general impression of her of being competent, of her being honest, and very, very well-educated," said Gibson. "It became clear that if Ellen [Johnson-Sirleaf] weren't elected, there was a good possibility this country would descend back into chaos."

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500 W. Baltimore Street, Baltimore, MD 21201-1786 PHONE: (410) 706-7214 FAX: (410) 706-4045 / TDD: (410) 706-7714

Copyright © 2014, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. All Rights Reserved