Faculty in the News - Archive



Friday, November 18, 2005

School of Law

The Daily Record – As part of the "Linking Art & Law" series, the School of Law teamed up with the Hippodrome Foundation Inc. the nonprofit presenter of Broadway shows in Baltimore to organize a panel discussion on issues raised by nontraditional casting: the use of actors of different skin colors, genders, disabilities, etc. in roles where they may not traditionally be considered.

Friday, November 18, 2005

Professor Larry Gibson

Afro-American Newspapers – Larry Gibson, LLB, professor at the School of Law, "has claimed a place in history after heading the successful campaign of Liberia's first female president, Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf." Gibson, who previously managed successful campaigns for Baltimore Mayor Kurt Schmoke and current Madagascar President Marc Ravalomanana, says, "After more than 35 years of doing political campaigns, this is the most important (one) because this was literally a matter of life or death of a nation."

Friday, November 18, 2005

Professor Larry Gibson

Afro-American Newspapers – Larry Gibson, LLB, professor at the School of Law, writes, "While it is certainly true that Liberia and other African nations are deeply patriarchal, the lesson of (Ellen) Johnson-Sirleaf's victory is nonetheless clear: In the context of fair democratic elections, qualified African women can and will win popular support–―not despite their gender, but in large part because of it%85from two-hut villages to urban centers, in all corners of Liberia, I consistently heard the refrain that male politicians had gravely failed the nation."

Thursday, November 17, 2005

Professor Michael Greenberger

WBAL-TV – Baltimore City has purchased five security cameras that have built-in motion detectors and a loud speaker system to discourage intruders away from the area of the camera. The mayor hopes the cameras can relieve police patrol officers so they can be used elsewhere. Michael Greenberger, JD, a professor in the School of Law and director of the Center for Health and Homeland Security, says the devices have proven effective elsewhere.

Wednesday, November 16, 2005

Professor Andrew Levy

The Baltimore Sun – Federal prosecutors will consider bringing charges against a youth accused of killing an Annapolis man in 2002, now that the U.S. Supreme Court has refused to revive Anne Arundel County's failed attempt to try the teen for murder. "Leeander Blake could be tried on federal charges of carjacking," said Andrew Levy, JD, adjunct professor at the School of Law. "Double jeopardy doesn't apply in this case," he said. The federal government can prosecute the same person for the same crime where both the federal and state governments have jurisdiction.

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Copyright © 2014, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. All Rights Reserved