Faculty in the News - Archive



Friday, December 30, 2005

Professor Michael Greenberger

Buffalo News, The Boston Globe, Bloomberg News - President Bush's authorization of eavesdropping in the U.S. to fight terrorism may make it more difficult to prosecute a range of cases, including illegal fundraising and drug offenses, legal scholars say. "If they'd been smart, they would have only used it to stop terrorist attacks from happening and not in prosecutions," said Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the University of Maryland Center for Health and Homeland Security. "Defense lawyers are obviously quite alert to the fact that they've got to go back and look at this: whether their defendants were charged based on evidence illegally obtained."

Wednesday, December 28, 2005

Professor Michael Greenberger

Sarasota Herald-Tribune Four years after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, federal officials still haven't fully addressed a vulnerability identified long before most Americans had ever heard of al-Qaida: inadequate security at the nation's 15,000 chemical plants. "This has been left to self-regulation, which is self-evidently constricted by the fact that the plants don't want to spend any more money than they have to," said Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the University of Maryland Center for Health and Homeland Security.

Friday, December 23, 2005

Professor Michael Greenberger

The Associated Press, The Los Angeles Times, and 26 more newspapers - If President Bush, buffeted by criticism regarding domestic spying, needs allies on wielding executive authority, he may look no further than his choices for the U.S. Supreme Court. Although Chief Justice John Roberts and nominee Samuel Alito are considered conservatives, the extent of granting executive authority on wiretaps and eavesdropping often doesn't fit the traditional political lines. "This isn't a clear-cut liberal-conservative issue," said Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the University of Maryland Center for Health and Homeland Security. "Libertarians and gun owners are worried about the government looking over their shoulders."

Thursday, December 22, 2005

Professor Michael Greenberger

The Los Angeles Times In a major setback for the White House on a top domestic priority, the U.S. Senate passed a six-month extension of the Patriot Act, due to expire Dec. 31, even though President Bush had demanded that most of the law become permanent. "It is nonsensical," said Michael Greenberger, JD, professor at the School of Law and director of the University of Maryland Center for Health and Homeland Security. "I think they are playing chicken with this thing."

Thursday, December 22, 2005

Professor Robert Condlin

The Daily Record A lawyer recently disbarred by the state's top court took official action to have a federal court in Baltimore overturn the sanction. But Robert Condlin, JD, a professor at the School of Law, guessed that the Maryland Court of Appeals will have to retract its opinion and then reissue it leaving Patrick Muhammad disbarred in any event.

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