Course Catalog

Writing in Law Practice: Animal Law Advocacy (3)

Writing in Law Practice: Animal Law Advocacy will focus on analysis and writing in the practice context of the emerging field of Animal Law. Students will study several areas of Animal Law and will use their substantive knowledge to complete writing assignments that mirror the types of writing that animal law practitioners do. The substantive component that informs the written work will involve looking at the legal treatment of animals in areas that may include torts, property, family law, estates and trusts, criminal law, and other state and federal statutory protections. There will be a number of short writing assignments, which will involve a variety of different documents. These documents may include short advocacy pieces that support various changes to current laws, dangerous dog appeals, and trusts that provide for the care of animals after a client’s death. Students will do their own research for the documents that they write. Class meetings will include practitioner guest speakers who can discuss with students the writing they do in their Animal Law practices. Given the course’s focus on practical writing and research, it is hoped that even students who do not have a strong interest in Animal Law will find it beneficial. The writing done for this course will not satisfy the Advanced Writing Requirement.

Current & Previous Instructors:
Susan Hankin;

This course is not currently scheduled.


Key to Codes in Course Descriptions
P: Prerequisite
C: Prerequisite or Concurrent Requirement
R: Recommended Prior or Concurrent Course

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500 W. Baltimore Street, Baltimore, MD 21201-1786 PHONE: (410) 706-7214 FAX: (410) 706-4045 / TDD: (410) 706-7714

Copyright © 2014, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. All Rights Reserved