University of Maryland Law Journal of Race, Religion, Gender and Class

Past Symposia


Spring Symposium: Friday, March 22, 2013

Gideon at Fifty: Fulfilling the Promise of Right to Counsel for Indigent Defendants

Fall Symposium: November 9, 2012

Children at Risk: Examining the Nexus Between Race, the Juvenile Justice System, and Public Education

Spring Symposium: April 12, 2012

Cannabis: A Viable Treatment for Veterans with PTSD?

On April 12, 2012, the Maryland Law Journal of Race, Religion, Gender, & Class in conjunction with the Community Justice Clinic and the Students for a Sensible Drug Policy, hosted "Cannabis: A Viable Treatment for Veterans with PTSD?" The distinguished panelists included Dr. Lynn McPherson, Mr. Michael Krawitz, Mr. Eric Sterling and Dr. Dan Morhaim. The event analyzed the use of medicinal marijuana as a viable treatment for veterans suffering from PTSD. Specifically, it addressed the ramifications of approving medicinal marijuana and also discussed the unmanageable side effects of the current drugs prescribed for the treatment of PTSD.

Please view the video if you are interested in watching the panelist discussion: 

Fall Symposium: November 11, 2011

Protecting Our Children: A Critical Look at LGBT Youth and Anti-Bullying Policy

On November 11th, 2011, the Maryland Law Journal of Race, Religion, Gender, and Class hosted a symposium entitled, "Protecting Our Children: A Critical Look at LGBT Youth and Anti-Bullying Policy." The symposium addressed bullying policy as it relates to LGBT youth and the school system. Our first panel discussed the meaning of bullying for LGBT youth in the context of schools as well as the recent trends in severity and type of bullying aimed at this population of students. The second panel analyzed the current policies, and lack thereof, that protect LGBT students in schools. Additionally, the panelists examined whether other types of protective actions can and do take place on behalf of LGBT youth at school. Our last panel addressed the viability of such policies and actions. Moreover, the panelists spoke to the likelihood and type of potential future changes in policy.

Spring Symposium: April 13, 2011

Domestic Violence: Causes, Prevention, and Advocacy

On April 6, 2011, the University of Maryland Journal of Race, Religion, Gender and Class held its spring symposium titled “Domestic Violence: Causes, Prevention, and Advocacy.” This panel was co-sponsored by the National Lawyers Guild, student chapter. The event consisted of lunch, panelist presentations, and a question and answer session. This discussion was aimed at covering topics such as causes and consequences of domestic violence against women, current laws that help or hinder abused women, and available resources for abused women and their advocates. The panelists also addressed the varying theoretical approaches to tackling domestic violence issues with respect to what works, what doesn't, and what should be altered. The panel consisted of the distinguished experts: Cynthia Lifson, Ellen Hare, Margaret Johnson, and Leigh Goodmark. You can view this symposium panel discussion here:

Fall Symposium: November 5, 2010

Confronting Islam: Sharia'ah the Constitution and American Muslims

On November 5, 2010, the University of Maryland Law Journal of Race, Religion, Gender and Class hosted its fall symposium entitled "Confronting Islam: Shari’ah, the Constitution and American Muslims." This symposium aimed to confront the mystery of Islam, Islamic law, and the legal struggles of Muslims in America. What does Shari'ah mean? Does Shari'ah conflict with secular court systems? What is the perception of Muslims in America, and what are their legal struggles? Through three engaging panel discussions and a lunch keynote address, the Maryland Law Journal of Race, Religion, Gender, and Class created a forum for much needed scholarly dialogue at this crucial juncture in American history. Will the rights of Muslims to practice their religion be respected in America, and to what extent?

Please view the links above to see the interesting discussion that unfolded during this symposium between an Islamic law scholar, experts, law professors, community members, practitioners and law students on Islamic Law, and Muslim American civil liberties.

Spring Symposium: March 24, 2010

Topic: Constitutional Challenge to California's Proposition 8

Symposium video

On March 24, 2010, the University of Maryland Law Journal of Race, Religion, Gender and Class and the LGBT Alliance hosted a panel discussion on the case of Perry v. Schwarzenegger. This case is a pending federal constitutional challenge to California's Proposition 8, which was a voter referendum that defined marriage between one man and one woman. The lead attorneys for the plaintiff are David Boies and Ted Olson, who are working together after appearing on opposing sides before the Supreme Court in Bush v. Gore.

The panelists included Mr. John Lewis from Marriage Equality USA and Professors Ertman, Singer, and Hellman from the University of Maryland School of Law. Mr. Lewis provided background on the litigation and first-hand impressions of the trial, and our three esteemed law professors examined the political and judicial climate regarding gay marriage and this challenge in particular, with special emphasis on the constitutional issue of equal protection.

Fall Symposium: November 6, 2009

Topic: Problem Solving Courts: A Conversation with the Experts

Symposium Agenda
Welcome
Panel 1
Panel 2
Keynote Address by Nancy Forester
Panel 3

Program Description: On November 6, 2009, the University of Maryland Law Journal of Race, Religion, Gender and Class hosted its Fall symposium entitled "Problem Solving Courts: A Conversation with the Experts." Problem solving courts are alternative court structures that aim to solve the underlying problem of the criminal, civil, or juvenile offense. Some examples are adult and juvenile drug courts, mental health courts, prostitution courts, truancy courts, unified family courts, and community courts. The mission of these problem solving courts is to improve the offender’s life and better the community by emphasizing rehabilitation and implementing multi-pronged solutions. However, problem solving courts are not without critics, who question the effectiveness of the courts and express due process as well as ethical concerns.

Please view the links above to enjoy a wide-ranging conversation with an array of local practitioners and national experts on the past, present, and future role of problem solving courts in our judicial system.

Fall Symposium: October 16, 2008

 

Topic: A Powerful Electorate?: The Impact of Election Law on American Democracy

Panel 1
Panel 2
Panel 3
Panel 4
Panel 5

Program Description: On October 16, 2008, the University of Maryland Law Journal of Race, Religion, Gender and Class hosted its Fall symposium entitled "A Powerful Electorate?: The Impact of Election Law on American Democracy." The event focused on how American laws have provided for or failed to adequately address the rights of American citizens to participate in the political process. Special attention was given to recent Supreme Court decisions pertaining to voting rights, Crawford v. Marion County School Board and Riley v. Kennedy. The symposium also featured a discussion on the potential for legal reform of election laws in Maryland and the United States.


Fall Symposium: October 11, 2007   Topic: Maryland Legal Services Corporation 25th Anniversary Symposium: Recognizing Twenty-Five Years of Accomplishments and Setting an Agenda for the Future

Conference Agenda (pdf)
Part One (video)
Part Two (video)
Part Three (video)
Part Four (video)

Program Description: The Maryland Legal Services Corporation (MLSC) was established by the Maryland General Assembly in 1982 to raise funds and grant nonprofit organizations civil legal assistance for low-income persons in Maryland. Since its inception, MLSC has awarded over $100 million to help provide public services to Maryland families in more than 1.4 million legal matters. MLSC also helped establish the Cardin clinical law requirement at the University of Maryland, which is one of only two U.S. law schools that require its students provide legal services to people who lack access. This symposium recognizes MLSC’s milestones and accomplishments, discusses how MLSC can improve access to justice, and sets an agenda for the future of public interest law.

Spring Symposium: March 28, 2007   Topic: "Searching for Harmony" - An Examination of Race-Based Classifications

Welcome
Panel 1
Panel 2

Program Description:The University of Maryland Law Journal of Race, Religion, Gender and Class hosted its annual Spring Symposium on March 28, 2007 in the Ceremonial Moot Courtroom. This event, which addressed race-based classifications, brought together professors, practitioners, and policy analysts from across the ideological spectrum to address the continued use of race-based classifications in the context of affirmative action and racial profiling. The event included Angela Ciccolo of the NAACP who delivered a keynote speech, a spirited debate between Professor Darren Hutchinson of American University’s Washington College of Law and Chris Hajec of the Center for Individual Rights on the proper role of affirmative action, and a discussion including Professor Jayesh Rathod of American University’s Washington College of Law, Professor Kathie Barnes of Washington University Law School and Julie Fernandes of the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights on racial profiling in a post 9/11 world.

Fall Symposium: November 16, 2006   Topic: Breaking Barriers: Current Issues Relating to Women, Labor and the Law.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

Program Description: The University of Maryland Law Journal of Race, Religion, Gender and Class hosted its annual Fall Town Hall on November 16, 2006 in the Ceremonial Moot Courtroom. This event, which addressed continuing issues relating to women in the workplace, brought together a diverse group of practitioners and policy advocates to address the continued advancement of women in the workplace and efforts to address the problem of trafficked women. The event included Lauren Rikleen of Bowditch & Dewey in Boston as the keynote speaker.  Mrs. Rikleen discussed her new book “Ending the Gauntlet:  Removing Barriers to Women’s Success in the Law” and efforts to increase women’s success in law firms.  The first panel addressed the continued advancement of women in the work place and included Kate Kahan of the National Partnership for Women and Families, Professor Meredith Render of University of Maryland School of Law, and Pam White of the law firm Ober|Kaler.  The second panel discussion changed gears and focused on efforts to address the problem of trafficked women and included Carol Angel, formerly of Legal Momentum, Elizabeth Keyes of CASA of Maryland, Inc., and Irena Lieberman of the American Bar Association’s Immigration Pro Bono and Bar Activation Project.
Spring Symposium: April 11, 2006   Topic: God's Law in the People's Law: A Discussion of Contemporary Issues Arising from Religion and The Law.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3

Program Description: The journal brought together a diverse group of academics and practitioners to discuss the role religion plays in the law, a comparative study of religion and the law, and the legal issues surrounding religion in public schools. Speakers included Dr. T. Jeremy Gunn of the ACLU, Prof. Gary Gildin of the Dickenson Law School at Penn State, Prof. Lucia Silecchia of the Columbus School of Law at Catholic University, Prof. George Taylor of the Univ. of Pittsburgh School of Law, Profs. Leigh Greenhaw and Martin Borowski of Washington Univ. School of Law, Richard Katskee of Americans United for Separation of Church and State, Prof. Robert Vischer of the Univ. of St. Thomas School of Law, and Prof. Jay Wexler of Boston Univ. School of Law. Members of the Univ. of Maryland School of Law faculty moderated the event.

Fall Town Hall: November 10, 2005   Topic: Broken Fences: Legal and Practical Realities of Immigration Reform in the Post-9/11 Age

 View Part 1
 View Part 2

Program Description: The journal brought together policy and legal experts to discuss various approaches and issues related to immigration reform. Speakers included Jeanne Butterfield, American Immigration Lawyers Assoc., Shoba Sivaprasad Wadhia, of the National Immigration Forum, Chris Nugent, of Holland & Knight, Ryan Ellis, of Americans for Tax Reform, Rajeev Goyle, of the Center for American Progress, Prof. Susan Akram, of Boston University, Kim Propeack, of CASA de Maryland, and Lory Rosenberg, of Immigration Defense and Expert Assistance.

Spring, 2005 Symposium   Topic: Correcting the Correctional System: Evaluating and Implementing the kennedy commission's Recommendations on Alternatives to Incarceration.

Program Description: On April 14, 2005, the University of Maryland Law Journal of Race, Religion, Gender and Class, in conjunction with the Clinical Law Program, hosted its annual Spring Symposium that focused on the implimentation of the Kennedy Commission's Recommendations on Alternatives to Incarceration. In the summer of 2003, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Anthony M. Kennedy gave a presentation to the American Bar Association's Annual Conference in San Francisco highlighting "inadequacies - and the injustices - in our prison and correctional systems." In October 2003, American Bar Association President Dennis Archer formed the Justice Kennedy Commission, to review and evaluate America's prison systems. After nearly a year of evaluations and hearings, the Commission has concluded that the nation's criminal justice system relies too heavily on incarceration as the only punishment, and other alternatives must be found. Participants in the event included Stephen Salzburg, Professor of Law at the George Washington University Law School and chair of the Kennedy Commission, George Kelling, professor at the Rutgers-Newark School of Criminal Justice and a proponent of the "broken windows" theory of crime prevention, Adam Mansky, Director of Operations, Center for Court Innovation in New York, and Mary Ann Saar, Secretary of the Department of Public Safety & Correctional Services for the State of Maryland.

Fall, 2004 Town Hall   The Sway of the Swing Vote: Justice Sandra Day O'Connor and Her Influence on Issues of Race, Religion, Gender and Class
 View the meeting

Program Description: In Fall, 2004, the University of Maryland Law Journal of Race, Religion, Gender and Class, in conjunction with the Women, Leadership & Equality Program at the University of Maryland School of Law presented an academic symposium addressing the role of gender in the jurisprudence of Sandra Day O'Connor. The interdisciplinary symposium was held as the journal's annual Town Hall and featured four panelists, Drs. Barbara Palmer and Diane Lowenthal of American University, Professor Stephen Gottlieb of Union Law School, Albany, and Professor Marley Weiss of the University of Maryland School of Law. The symposium was moderated by Professor Jana Singer.


Spring, 2004 Symposium   The Death Penalty in the United States: Exploring Modern Implications
 View Part 1 of the symposium
 View Part 2(a) of the symposium
 View Part 2(b) of the symposium
 View Part 3 of the symposium
 View Part 4 of the symposium
 View Part 5 of the symposium

Program Description: In Spring, 2004, the University of Maryland Law Journal of Race, Religion, Gender and Class engaged academics, practitioners, legislators, and others who have experienced the impact of capital punishment in America in a day-long symposium. Issues discussed were the history and sociology of the Death Penalty, procedural aspects of capital punishment in Maryland, the effect of race, the impact of DNA testing, mental health issues, and recent events involving juveniles and the Death Penalty. The University of Maryland Law Journal of Race, Religion, Gender and Class was fortunate to have Kirk Bloodsworth, exonerated Death Row inmate as one of our esteemed panelists. Professor Raymond Paternoster's report on the effect of Race and the Death Penalty was published in the Spring, 2004 volume of the University of Maryland Law Journal of Race, Religion, Gender and Class.


Fall, 2003 Town Hall   Topic: Redefining Family, Redefining Society: The Transformation of Legal Perspectives on Sexuality

Program Description: Our Fall, 2003 Town Hall confronted issues related to recent activity in legislation and case law regarding family law and same-sex couples. Our panelists discussed the legal rights conferred by marriage, and offered a balanced perpective on both the preservation of "traditional families" and the interests of same-sex couples in achieving legal parity with opposite-sex families. Articles from Liz Seaton, Human Rights Campaign, and Joshua Baker, Marriage Law project appear in the Spring, 2004 issue of the University of Maryland Law Journal of Race, Religion, Gender and Class.

Spring, 2003 Symposium   Topic: Access to Justice
 View Part 1 of 2 of the symposium (Real Media)
 View Part 2 of 2 of the symposium (Real Media)

Program Description: While the U.S. Supreme Court has held that the Sixth Amendment guarantees indigent defendants the right to court-appointed counsel in criminal cases, those who cannot afford counsel in civil cases lack the right to government-funded representation. Although appointed counsel is not mandated in civil cases, there have been myriad proposed solutions to increase legal access to the poor. For example, some propose a mandatory pro bono system, while others call for the expansion of existing legal service corporations. Additionally, others have proposed alternative dispute resolution or other processes whereby attorneys would play a lesser role, decreasing the need for additional funding. Also, many states have established Income on Lawyer’s Trust Accounts (IOLTA) funds, which are a major source of financial support for legal services providers. The constitutionality of the use of IOLTA funds is being challenged in the Supreme Court.

The University of Maryland Law Journal of Race, Religion, Gender and Class hosted a symposium that addressed Access to Justice in Maryland. Part I focused on the then-current state of legal services and the possible expansion of representation to indigents in civil cases. In particular, the panel discussed the constitutionality, feasibility and benefits of extending government funding to indigents in civil matters. Part II addressed other means of resolving legal disputes such as Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) as well as the debate over allowing lay persons to have more autonomy in litigating their claims with less assistance from counsel.

Fall, 2002 Town Hall   Topic: Reparations
  View the meeting (Real Media)

Spring, 2002 Symposium and Radio Documentary   Topic: "Forgotten Voices:" Women in the Criminal Justice System
 Listen to the project (Real Media)

Program Description: The number of women incarcerated in America continues to rise. This presents a growing need to recognize that the incarceration of women raises many difficult issues that are different from those involving the incarceration of men. On March 14, 2002, the University of Maryland Law Journal of Race, Religion, Gender and Class sponsored a symposium to discuss these issues. This event corresponded with the broadcast of the radio documentary titled "Forgotten Voices."

"Forgotten Voices" was co-produced by the University of Maryland Law Journal of Race, Religion, Gender and Class and the University of Maryland, Baltimore County's Music Department and included interviews with women detained at the Baltimore City Detention Center. The inmates and staff told their stories and discussed the availability and effectiveness of rehabilitative services both in BCDC and in their communities. The project gave a valuable and intimate depiction of one facility's treatment of its female inmates.

Fall, 2001 Town Hall   Topic: Legislating Morality: The Problem of Moral Right and Legal Rights
Program Description:This symposium provided a forum to discuss the role of lawmakers in legislating morality. As the moral culture of the United States is considered pluralistic, the forum discussed the permissible scope of moral beliefs as reflected in the laws of the land. Because many different moral communities comprise American society, this leads to fundamental disagreements about issues that engage courts and legislators. These disagreements may be based on religious values and/or principles. Citizens and theorists often accept the fact legislators make moral judgments and, at times, must enact them into law. This forum explored varying perspectives surrounding the conflicts between these moral and legal rights.

Fall, 2001 Special Town Hall   Topic: The New Freedom: The Effects of Recent Anti-Terrorism Legislation on Religious and Ethnic Minorities

Fall, 2001 Town Hall   Topic: Policing Under O'Malley: The Baltimore City Police Department Town Meeting

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Copyright © 2014, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. All Rights Reserved