From the 2008 News Archive
Print this page      E-mail this story      Bookmark and Share

Leading Race and Gender Scholar Julie Nokov to Deliver Marshall Lecture on April 14

Julie Nokov, associate professor of political science and women's studies at the University at Albany, SUNY, will deliver the Student Bar Association’s annual Thurgood Marshall Lecture, "Crafting a Racial State: The Regulation of Interracial Intimacy and the Making of Modern Alabama," on Monday, April 14, at 4:30 p.m. in the School of Law’s Ceremonial Courtroom.

One of the leading young race and gender scholars in the country, she is the author of Racial Union: Law, Intimacy, and the White State in Alabama, 1865-1954 (University of Michigan Press, 2007), which uses the history of Alabama's efforts between the end of the Civil War and the dawn of the civil rights era to suppress interracial sexual intimacy to investigate the rise of white supremacy.

Nokov's research and teaching are situated at the intersection of law, history, US political development, and subordinated identity. She views law as both a system of political and social control and as a site for reform through activists' pressure. She is particularly interested in the way that the law defines and translates categories associated with identity, such as race and gender, and the ways that these categories transform and are transformed by legal discourse.

Nokov is currently working on two co-edited volumes, one on race and US political development and another on race, gender and militarization. Her next major research project will be a political and developmental history of the legal regulation of child labor in the United States. Her first book, Constituting Workers, Protecting Women (University of Michigan Press 2001), addressed gender and constitutional development, rereading through the lens of gender the history of the courts' unwillingness to accept protective legislation for workers in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. She has also authored several articles in scholarly journals and books, including a 2002 article in Law and History Review.


Print this page      E-mail this story      Bookmark and Share

Back To Top

500 W. Baltimore Street, Baltimore, MD 21201-1786 PHONE: (410) 706-7214 FAX: (410) 706-4045 / TDD: (410) 706-7714
Copyright © 2014, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. All Rights Reserved.

Hotline Hotline



UM | About This Site | Site Map | Contact Us


500 W. Baltimore Street, Baltimore, MD 21201-1786 PHONE: (410) 706-7214 FAX: (410) 706-4045 / TDD: (410) 706-7714

Copyright © 2014, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. All Rights Reserved