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Professors Ponder Post-Election Issues

The two questions after every election: What happened (and why)? Where do we go from here? Perhaps these questions are more important this year after what many would call a bitter and divisive campaign season.

For the Maryland Carey Law community, it means continuing to focus on issues such as justice and the rule of the law, and empowering our students—and our alumni—to harness the power of the law to work for our community.

Here are some reactions and ways forward from some of the Maryland Carey Law faculty:

“Empowering Law Students in a Time of Trouble”

Karen Czapanskiy, Concurring Opinions
“…I hope [students] appreciate the power of lawyers to enhance the lives of others who need our nation to have a government of laws and not a government of individuals,” says Czapanskiy, who argues that our legal system, and therefore lawyers, are key to effecting national change. “As lawyers-to-be, my students need to understand that they will have power to share. As lawyers, we are entrusted with knowing the law. We see when government officials are overstepping their boundaries. We can help educate the public, we can offer help, and we can put our knowledge and skills to work.”

 “The Id, The Ego And The Election”

Martha Ertman, The Huffington Post
Ertman takes a look at the election through the lens of psychology, noting, “If the country has a personality, just as each of us does individually, the Id has triumphed over the Superego.” Through the spectrum of treating our three political branches as subsets of our national personality, Ertman argues the balance of the three will ensure our future: “In short the body politic – like individual personalities ― has lots of built-in defenses.”

“First Edition Nov 9: Coverage and Analysis of Election Results”

Larry Gibson, WEAA
Gibson took questions from the public on a variety of issues, including immediate analysis of the results, voter suppression, the legacy of President Obama, and the future of Baltimore. “I tend to look at things at a historical perspective, but also look to the future. As I look forward, I just think of how resilient we are as a people. There is a saying that a ‘set back’ is a set up for ‘come back'…” notes Gibson.  

"Women, leadership, and 2016"

Paula Monopoli, The Boston Globe
Monopoli examined the role gender possible played in the election, noting, “The American presidency is a consolidated executive office that combines the head of state, head of government, and commander-in-chief functions in a single person. The aim was to ensure that the executive would be strong enough to protect the young nation. But this “agentic,” or masculine, model of the executive differs from most other western democracies — many of which have already had female leaders — and tends to reinforce gender stereotypes about leadership.” 

 


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500 W. Baltimore Street, Baltimore, MD 21201-1786 PHONE: (410) 706-7214 FAX: (410) 706-4045 / TDD: (410) 706-7714

Admissions: PHONE: (410) 706-3492 FAX: (410) 706-1793

Copyright © 2018, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. All Rights Reserved